• Non ci sono risultati.

fulltext

N/A
N/A
Protected

Academic year: 2021

Condividi "fulltext"

Copied!
8
0
0

Testo completo

(1)

Trace forms for the generalized Wigner functions

G. M. D’ARIANO(1,2) and M. F. SACCHI(1)

(1) Dipartimento di Fisica “Alessandro Volta”

Università degli Studi di Pavia - via A. Bassi 6, I-27100 Pavia, Italy (2) Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

Department of Physics and Astronomy

Northwestern University - Evanston, IL 60208, USA (ricevuto il 27 Settembre 1996; approvato il 26 Novembre 1996)

Summary. — We derive simple formulas connecting the generalized Wigner

functions for s-ordering with the density matrix, and vice versa. These formulas proved very useful for quantum-mechanical applications, as, for example, for connecting master equations with Fokker-Planck equations, or for evaluating the quantum state from Monte Carlo simulations of Fokker-Planck equations, and finally for studying positivity of the generalized Wigner functions in the complex plane. PACS 03.65.Bz – Foundations, theory of measurement, miscellaneous theories (including Aharonov-Bohm effect, Bell inequalities, Berry’s phase).

PACS 42.50.Dv – Nonclassical field states, squeezed, antibunched, and sub-Pois-sonian states; operational definitions of the phase of the field; phase measurements.

Since Wigner’s pioneering work [1], generalized phase-space techniques have proved very useful in various branches of physics [2]. As a method for expressing the density operator in terms of c-number functions, the Wigner functions often lead to considerable simplification of the quantum equations of motion, as for example, by transforming operator master equations into more amenable Fokker-Planck differential equations (see, for example, ref. [3]). By the Wigner function one can express quantum-mechanical expectation values in form of averages over the complex plane (the classical phase space), the Wigner function playing the role of a c-number quasi-probability distribution, which generally can also have negative values. More precisely, the original Wigner function allows to easily evaluate expectations of symmetrically ordered products of the field operators, corresponding to Weyl’s quantization procedure [4]. However, with a slight change of the original definition, one defines generalized s-ordered Wigner function Ws(a , a–), as follows [5]:

Ws(a , a–) u



d2l p2 e al2 al 1s 2NlN 2 Tr[D(l) r×] , (1) 881

(2)

where the integration is performed on the complex plane with measure d2

l 4

d Re l d Im l, D(a) 4eaa2 aa denotes the displacement operator, and a and a([a , a] 41) are the annihilation and creation operators of the field mode of interest. Then, using the Wigner function in eq. (1) one can evaluate s-ordered expectation values of the field operators through the following relation:

Tr [:(a)n

am:sr×] 4



d2a Ws(a , a) anam.

(2)

It is easy to show that the particular cases s 421, 0, 1 lead to antinormal,

symmetrical, and normal ordering, respectively, in which cases the generalized

Wigner function Ws(a , a–) historically was denoted with the following symbols and

names: Ws(a , a–) 4

.

`

/

`

´

1 pQ(a , a) W(a , a–) P(a , a–) for s 421 “Q-function” ,

for s 40 (usual Wigner function) , for s 41 “P-function” .

(3)

For the normal (s 41) and antinormal (s421) orderings, the following two simple relations between the generalized Wigner function and the density matrix are well known: Q(a , a) f aaNr×Nab , (4) r × 4



d2a P(a , a) NabaaN , (5)

where Nab denotes the customary coherent state Nab 4D(a)N0b, N0b being the vacuum state of the field. Among the three particular representations (3), it is also well known that the Q-function is positively definite and infinitely differentiable (it actually represents the probability distribution for ideal joint measurements of position and momentum of the harmonic oscillator: see, for example, ref. [6]). On the other hand, the

P-function is known to be possibly highly singular, and the only pure states for which it

is positive are the coherent states [7]. Finally, the usual Wigner function has the remarkable property of providing the probability distributions of the quadratures of the field in form of marginal distributions, namely



d Im a W(aeif, ae2if) 4

faRe aNr×NRe abf,

(6)

where Nxbf stands for the eigenstates of the field quadrature X×f4 (aeif1 h . c . ) O2

(any couple of conjugated quadratures X×f, X×f 1pO2, with [X×f, X×f 1pO2] 4iO2, are

equivalent to the position and momentum of a harmonic oscillator). Usually, negative values of the Wigner function are viewed as signature of a nonclassical state (one of the more eloquent examples is given by the Schrödinger-cat states [8] whose Wigner function is characterized by rapid oscillations around the origin of the complex plane). From eq. (1) one can see that all s-ordered Wigner functions are related to each other

(3)

through the convolution relation Ws(a , a–) 4



d2b Ws 8(b , b – ) 2 p(s 82s)exp

k

2 2 s 82sNa 2 bN 2

l

, (7) Ws(a , a–) 4exp

y

s 82s 2 ¯2 ¯a¯a

z

Ws 8(a , a) , (s 8Ds) . (8)

Equation (7) shows the positiveness of the generalized Wigner function for s E21, as a consequence of the positiveness of the Q-function. From a qualitative point of view, the maximum value of s keeping the generalized Wigner functions as positive can be considered as an indication of the classical nature of the physical state.

In this paper we present three equivalent trace forms that connect s-ordered Wigner functions with the density matrix. They are the following:

Ws(a , a–) 4 2 p( 1 2s)e 2 2 1 2sNaN 2 Tr

y

g

s 11 s 21

h

aa e 2 1 2saa r ×e 2 1 2saa

z

, (9) Ws(a , a–) 4 2 p( 1 2s)e 2 1 1sNaN 2 Tr

y

g

s 11 s 21

h

aa e2 2 1 1saar ×e2 2 1 1saa

z

, (10) Ws(a , a–) 4 (11) 4 2 p( 1 2s)e 2 2 s 1 2s2NaN 2 Tr

yg

s 11 1 2s

h

1 2aa D

u

2 a

k

1 2s2

v

g

s 11 1 2s

h

1 2aa (2)aar×

z

. Equations (9), (10) can be compared with the Cahill-Glauber formula [5]

Ws(a , a–) 4 2 p( 1 2s)Tr

m

: exp

k

2 2 1 2s(a2 a)(a 2a)

l

: r×

n

, (12)

where the colons denote the usual normal ordering; eq. (11) represents a generalization of the formula [9]

W(a , a) 4 2

pTr

[

r×D( 2 a) exp [ipa

a]

]

. (13)

Vice versa, the density matrix can be recovered from the generalized Wigner functions using the following expression:

r × 4 2 1 1s



d2 aWs(a , a) e 2 2 1 1sNaN 2 exp

k

2 a 1 1sa

lk

s 21 s 11

l

aa exp

y

2 a1 1sa

z

. (14)

The proof of our statements requires the following identity:

ea†¯aN0 ba 0 Nea¯a Na 4a–4 0eNaN 2 1 al 2al–21 2NlN 2 4 D(l) , (15)

(4)

which is proved in the appendix. Then, through the following steps: Ws(a , a–) 4



d2l p2 e al2 al 1s 2NlN 2 Tr [D(l) r×] 4 4



d 2l p2 e al2 alTr [ea†¯bN0 ba 0 Nea¯br×] N b 4b–4 0e NbN21 bl 2bl–11 2(s 21)NlN 2 4 4 2 p( 1 2s)Tr [e a†¯bN0 ba 0 Nea¯br×] N b 4b–4 0 e 21 1s 1 2sNbN 2 2 2 1 2s(NaN 2 2 ab2 ab) 4 4 2 p( 1 2s)e 2 2 1 2sNaN 2 Tr

y

e1 2s2 aa

g

21 1s 1 2s

h

aa e 2 1 2saa r ×

z

, one proves eq. (9). Continuing from the last result we have

Ws(a , a–) 4 2 p( 1 2s)e 2 2 1 2sNaN 2 Q Q Tr

y

g

11s 12s

h

1 2aa

g

1 2s 11s

h

1 2aa e 2 12saa

g

211s 12s

h

aa e 2 12saa

g

12s 11s

h

1 2aa

g

11s 12s

h

1 2aa r×

z

4 4 2 p( 1 2s)e 2 2 1 2sNaN 2 Tr

y

g

1 1s 1 2s

h

1 2aa e 2 k1 2s2aa † (2)aa e 2 k1 2s2aa

g

1 1s 1 2s

h

1 2aa r ×

z

4 4 2 p( 1 2s)e 2 2 s 1 2s2NaN 2 Tr

y

g

1 1s 1 2s

h

1 2aa D

u

2 a

k

1 2s2

v

g

1 1s 1 2s

h

1 2aa (2)aa r×

z

, which proves eq. (11). Equation (10) is derived using the following identities:

e 2 a 1 2sa

g

s 11 s 21

h

aa e 2 a1 2sa4

g

s 11 s 21

h

aa e2 2 a 1 1sae 2 a1 2sa, e 4 NaN2 1 2s2

g

s 11 s 21

h

aa e 2 a1 2sae2 2 a 1 1sa4 e 4 NaN2 1 2s2 e2 2 a1 1sa

g

s 11 s 21

h

aa e2 2 a 1 1sa † .

As a check, from eqs. (9)-(11) one can easily recover the usual definition of the Wigner function (1) for s 40, and eq. (4) for the Q-function (s421), namely

W21(a , a) 4 1

pe

2NaN2Tr [ (2O1)aaeaar×eaa

] 4 4 1 pe 2NaN2Tr [N0ba0Neaa r ×eaa] 4 1 pQ(a , a – ) . The inversion formula (14) is obtained using eq. (11) and the following formula [5]:

O×4



d

2a

p Tr [O×D(a) ] D

(a) , (16)

(5)

that holds true for any Hilbert-Schmidt operator O×, and hence for a (trace-class) density matrix. One has

g

s 11 1 2s

h

1 2aa (2)aar×

g

s 11 1 2s

h

1 2aa 4 (17) 4



d 2a p Tr

y

D(a)

g

s 11 1 2s

h

1 2aa (2)aar×

g

s 11 1 2s

h

1 2aa

z

D(a) 4 4 4 1 2s2



d2a p Ws(a , a) p( 1 2s) 2 e 2 s 1 2s2NaN 2 D

u

2 a

k

1 2s2

v

. Hence, r × 4 2 1 1s



d2a W s(a , a) e 2 s 1 2s2NaN 2

g

1 2s 1 1s

h

1 2aa (2)aa D

u

2 a

k

1 2s2

v

g

1 2s 1 1s

h

1 2aa 4 4 2 1 1s



d 2a W s(a , a) e2 2 1 1sNaN 2

g

1 2s 1 1s

h

1 2aa e 2 a k1 2s2 a† (2)aae 2 a– k1 2s2 a

g

1 2s 1 1s

h

1 2aa ,

and then the result follows easily. In particular, for s 40 one has the inverse of the Glauber formula

r

× 42



d2a W(a , a

) D( 2 a)(2)aa,

(18)

whereas for s 41 one recovers the relation (5) that defines the P-function.

The trace form of eqs. (9)-(11) can be used for an analysis of positivity of the Wigner function, usually a quite difficult task, as confirmed in ref. [10]. In particular, from eq. (9) one can immediately see that for s E1 (namely, with the only exception of the

P-function) the s-Wigner function can become negative, because the operator e 2 1 2saa r ×e 2 1 2saa

is positive-definite, whereas the preceding factor

g

s 11

s 21

h

aa

is negative for s E1, and positivity is guaranteed only for products of positive operators. On the other hand, from eq. (11) one can easily see that there is always a state (the eigenstate of a

a with odd eigenvalue) that makes the s-Wigner function at a 40

negative for s E0.

The representations (9), (10) for the generalized Wigner functions also provide the easiest way to derive differential representations for boson operators acting on a density matrix. By defining, analogously to eq. (1), the generalized Wigner symbol for any operator O× , Ws(a , aNO×) u



d2l p2 e al2 al 1s 2NlN 2 Tr [D(l) O×] , (19)

(6)

from eqs. (9), (10) one immediately derives the relations Ws(a , aNar×) 4e 2 2 1 2sNaN 2 1 2s 2 ¯ae 2 1 2sNaN 2 Ws(a , a–) 4

g

a 1 1 2s 2 ¯a

h

Ws(a , a) , (20) Ws(a , aNar×) 4e 2 1 1sNaN 2

g

21 1s 2 ¯a

h

e 2 2 1 1sNaN 2 Ws(a , a–) 4 (21) 4

g

a2 1 1s 2 ¯a

h

Ws(a , a) ,

and analogous relations for right multiplication by the boson operator. More generally, one can write a differential representation for any super-operator—i.e. right or left multiplication by an operator O×—namely

Ws(a , aNO×r×) uFs[O× Q] Ws(a , a–) , Ws(a , aNr×O×) uFs[Q O×] Ws(a , a–) ,

(22)

where O× Q and Q O× denote left and right multiplication by the operator O×, respectively, and Fs are differential forms functions of a, a–, ¯a and ¯a– with the following

properties: Fs[O×1O×2Q] 4Fs[O×1Q] Fs[O×2Q] , (23) Fs[Q O×1O×2] 4Fs[Q O×2] Fs[Q O×1] , (24)

[

Fs[Q O×1], Fs[O×2Q]

]

4 0 , (25) Fs[Q O×] 4Fs[O׆Q] . (26)

TABLEI. – Differential Wigner representation of some super-operators.

Super-operator Fs a Q a 1 1 2s 2 ¯aaQ a– 2 1 1s 2 ¯a Q a a 2 1 1s 2 ¯aQ aa– 1 1 2s 2 ¯a a Q aNaN21 1 2s 2 ( 1 1a¯a1 a¯ a) 1

g

1 2s 2

h

2 ¯aaaQ a NaN22 1 1s 2 ( 1 1a¯a1 a¯ a) 1

g

1 1s 2

h

2 ¯aaaa Q NaN21 1 2[ ( 1 2s)a¯ a2 ( 1 1 s) a¯a2 ( 1 1 s) 2 1 2( 1 2s 2) ¯ aa–] Q aa NaN21 1 2[ ( 1 2s)a¯a2 ( 1 1 s) a – ¯a2 ( 1 1 s) 2 1 2( 1 2s 2) ¯ aa–]

(7)

The functional forms of the basic super-operators are summarized in table I. The representations of Q aand Q a can be easily obtained from those of a Q and a†Q using identities (26). Equation (25) is just the obvious statement that «left multiplication commutes with right multiplication» (for a and athis corresponds to the identity [¯

a1

ka–, ¯a1 ka] 4 0). Then, the differential representation of higher-order

super-operators is easily obtained from the composition rules (23) and (24). Using the differential representation for Bose super-operators, one can convert master equations into (possibly high order) Fokker-Planck equations. For example, the master equation of the damped harmonic oscillator (damping coefficient g and thermal photons n–)

¯tr× 42

g

2(n

1 1 )(aar× 1r×aa 22ar×a†) 2 g 2 n

(aar

× 1r×aa

2 2 ar×a) , (27)

can be converted into the equivalent Fokker-Planck equation for the s-ordered Wigner function ¯tWs(a , a–) 4 g 2

k

¯aa 1¯aa1 ( 2 n1 1 2 s) ¯aa

l

Ws(a , a) . (28)

For solving Fokker-Planck equations, one can use very efficient Monte-Carlo Green-function simulation methods (see, for example, ref. [11]), choosing the parameter s such that both the Wigner function and the diffusion coefficient remain positive during the evolution. Then, from the inversion equation (14) one can recover the matrix elements anNr×Nmb of the operator r× in form of Monte Carlo integrals of Laguerre polynomials.

In conclusion, we have presented simple trace formulas that connect the generalized Wigner functions with the density matrix, and vice versa, and we have shown how they can be practically used for: i) studying positivity of the generalized Wigner functions; ii) connecting master equations with Fokker-Planck equations; iii) evaluating the quantum state in Monte Carlo simulations of Fokker-Planck equations.

AP P E N D I X

Proof of identity (15). From the relation

¯na–¯maNa 4a–4 0eNaN 2 4 dnmn! , (A.1) one has ea†¯aN0 ba 0 Nea¯a Na 4a–4 0eNaN 2 4

!

n , m 40 Q (a†)nN0 ba 0 Nam ¯ n a¯ma n!m!

N

a 4a–4 0 eNaN2 4 (A.2) 4

!

n 40 Q (a)n N0 ba 0 Nan 1 n! 4n 40

!

Q NnbanN 4 1× .

(8)

Hence, using the identities

ea†¯aeal

4 el(a1 a–)ea†¯a, ea¯ae2al4 e2l(a 1a)ea¯a, (A.3) one obtains ea†¯aN0 ba 0 Nea¯a Na 4a–4 0e NaN21 al 2al–21 2NlN 2 4 (A.4) 4 e2 1 2NlN 2 eal 2aleal ea†¯aN0 ba 0 Ne a¯a Na 4a–4 0eNaN 2 e2la 4 e2 1 2NlN 2 eale2al4 D(l) . R E F E R E N C E S

[1] WIGNERE. P., Phys. Rev., 40 (1932) 749.

[2] KIMY. S. and ZACHARY W. W. (Editors), The Physics of Phase Space (Springer, Berlin) 1986.

[3] GARDINERC. W., Quantum Noise (Springer, Berlin) 1991.

[4] WEYLH., The Theory of Groups and Quantum Mechanics (Dover, New York) 1950. [5] CAHILLK. E. and GLAUBERR. J., Phys. Rev., 177 (1969) 1857.

[6] For a tutorial review on concepts of quantum measurements and applications to quantum optics, see: D’ARIANOG. M., Quantum estimation theory and optical detection, in Concepts and Advances in Quantum Optics and Spectroscopy of Solids, edited by T. HAKIOG˘ LUand A. S. SHUMOVSKY(Kluwer Academic Publishers, Amsterdam) 1996.

[7] CAHILLK. E., Phys. Rev. B, 138 (1965) 1566.

[8] D’ARIANOG. M., FORTUNATOM. and TOMBESIP., Nuovo Cimento B, 110 (1995) 1127. [9] CAHILLK. E. and GLAUBERR. J., Phys. Rev., 177 (1969) 1882.

[10] ORLCOWSKIA. and WU¨NSCHEA., Phys. Rev. A, 48 (1993) 4697.

Riferimenti

Documenti correlati

An important and less trivial consequence of the rank formula is the following. 1.28 Theorem (Rank of

The language centre, together with the Internationalisation office, are attempting to meet the needs of a growing number of academic staff who are teaching their content

Then we have studied the abundance gradients along the Galactic disk produced by our best cosmological model and their dependence upon several parameters: a threshold in the surface

The quantification of quantumness is necessary to assess how much a physical system departs from a classical behaviour and thus gauge the quantum enhancement in opera- tional tasks

Infine, è proprio a partire dal 1966 che i Beatles si misero alla ricerca dell’Io, della consapevolezza spirituale: gli strumenti furono trip fantastici con l’LSD, corsi di

- methylguanine-DNA-methyltransferase; MLH1, mutL homologue 1; miRNA, microRNA; MMR, mismatch repair; MMS22L, MMS22-like; MND1, meiotic nuclear division protein 1 homo- log;

Following the filter we have the key-component of this work, that is the Low Noise Amplifier, then the first Mixer, that translates the carrier frequency to a lower and

In particular it linearizes the system in the following way: if the input signal at the gate increases, a larger drain current will flow through the inductor, its voltage drop